Feedback on my new storyboards…

Posted: November 10, 2010 in Media

Well to get the best feedback I got my audience to watch each trailer, compare them, and then choose which trailer they prefered (giving reasons obviously) …

The second try…

Or the third one…

Q: So, after watching trailer storyboard no.2 and no.3, which do think is better? Please give reasons why..

Their answers…

We have a winner. My third storyboard (no.3, which is above) wins in a landslide. Why??…

‘Number 3- because it made more sense than the other one.’

‘I like  3 more because the music was better- it fitted the trailer.’

‘I vote no.3 because the other one wasn’t as effective and this one had better titles.’

What this tells me…

Well it gives me a winner at least. My new storyboard that I have chosen to keep and use is number 3. This is due to the fact that my audience thought it was the better one out of the two and in my own personal opinion I agree with them. I thought the music/titles of the 2nd one didn’t work and that the titles in the 3rd were more effective and had more information about the film to convey to the audience. I was happy to find that the audience agreed with me on these points and will therefore take notice of their choice and act upon it.

After this I let the audience answer the following questions on the chosen trailer , which was no.3, (so that I could a better view of where to go next with my storyboard)…

Q: After looking at my storyboard, can you tell what the genre of the film will be?? (You can state more than one, but please give reasons to your judgements)

Their answers…

‘Thriller- because it looks like it will be clever and very mysterious.’

‘I would say a  thriller because it looks like it will be dark and have a lot of crime in it also.’

Thriller/revenge- revenge because the titles talk about not forgiving people and the review says the film is about vengeance. And  thriller because to get revenge there’ll probably be murders- which is also shown by the weapons.’

What this tells me…

I’m very happy with these answers as it conveys the fact that I have, in some way, gotten my chosen genre (and somewhat the big theme of my film) across to the audience in the trailer. So I’m quite pleased with the fact these audiences have seemed to recognize various conventions of the thriller film I have included in the trailer- such as the shots of the murder weapons, lots of extreme close-ups and the mystery element. But the only thing that is troubling me is the question of whether I have followed the conventions of the genre to closely- therefore could it be too clichéd? therefore could it make my film appear like it is predictable of its genre? It’s something I need to consider as I go onto my filming…as I want to make sure my genre is clearly put across to the audience but does not come across as too obvious/predictable. 

Q: How did it make you feel? (As in scared or upbeat etc)

Their answers…

‘Scared- like when the people were hiding in the cupboard and were spotted- I felt like I was actually in the film and this killer was going to get me!’

‘Tense- Because I have no idea of what is going on. It’s be interesting to find out what will happen to the characters.’

‘It made me feel  very confused and tense- because I don’t really know what is going to happen in the film but I want to know…’

What this tells me…

I know different audiences are going to feel completely different emotions while watching my trailer because of their own personal point of view/perception. But I’m glad with the answers I have heard as I want my trailer to appear quite creepy/scary (as thrillers can often be found to be frightening) and it also portrays the horrible aspects within the film which would naturally scare audiences (which mostly lie in Jack’s past and the horrible things that happened to him- s*xual abuse, torture, physical abuse, peer pressure, bullying, all that stuff). I want the trailer also to interest audiences for the main reason of, if there is no interest left in the audience after viewing the trailer, then it’s obvious the trailer isn’t going to be very successful (they won’t be interested in going to see the film itself) so I naturally want audiences to be interested on what happens in my film, and this is why I have left so many questions raised but not answered in my trailer. Tension is also a good feeling to have as a noticed this in a lot of thriller trailers especially- making audiences tense leads them to an extent, similar to the state they are if they are interested but even more so- they are tense, they HAVE to see what happens next- and the only way to do that is to watch the film itself- therefore the trailer is a success. Confusion though can be good and bad- I want the audience to be a little confused so that they can’t guess the rest of the film and find it simple to predict what is to come, but I don’t want them to get so confused that they have absolutely no idea of what is going on or will happen- so I want to make sure, while filming, that my trailer is neither of these extremes (as both can equally negatively affect my trailer and its overall quality).

Q: If this was a real trailer, would you feel inclined to go on to watch the film afterwards? Why?

Their answers…

‘Yes- I want to know what will happen to the characters- like who gets killed and why.’

‘Yeah- I want to see who the killer is. And I want to know why he seems to be killing lots of characters- also- does he get away with it?’

‘Yes I would watch the film as I want to know how it all ends.’

What this tells me…

Overall I’m happy with these results- they tell me that my trailer may achieve the goal of interesting the viewers enough so that (if my film were real) they’d then go onto to watch the film, or at least, feel as though they’d be interested in seeing it. It’s also interesting to see the reasons why the audience members said they felt they’d like to see the film after watching the trailer- such as how they said they want to see who the killer is and his motives. I felt this was a vital thing to leave a mystery in the trailer itself as this way, as it is clear from what feedback I have, audiences will be intrigued to know who the killer is and why he appears to be killing people. So I want to make sure, throughout the filming process that I focus on making sure that in no way is my killer identified or his true motives put across (or else audiences may lose interest as they’ll already know the killer’s identity and this is usually the biggest mystery of a thriller film and what leads them to become unpredictable). 

Q: What questions were raised in the trailer that you want answers to?

Their answers…

‘I want to know who the character is that is doing ‘awful things’ and why he is doing them (his motives)’

‘I want to know which characters get killed and by whom. I also want to know how this affects the film.’

There were some- mostly about Alice and whether she’ll be able to catch the killer and who the killer is.’ 

What this tells me…

This tells me my trailer does indeed raise questions the audiences want the answer to- which I think is a good thing for a trailer to do (as if it does not raise questions then why would the audience be interested in seeing the film?). So I now may want to consider other questions that are raised in my trailer and make sure they left a mystery and are not answered in the trailer itself as this will ruin its overall quality. 

Q: Can you predict what will happen in the film itself from watching the trailer? Explain.

Their answers…

‘Not really- I know it’s likely that a lot of characters will get murdered but I’m not sure how/why.’

‘I can’t say that I could- some things are obvious- like that a character is going to come into the film and bad things will start happening and Alice will try to stop it- but I don’t know who the character is/ what the bad things are/ if Alice will be able to stop it.’

‘No I don’t think so- it’s hard to see what will happen in the rest of the film.’

What this tells me…

Well it’s good because, as I said earlier, I don’t want my trailer to make the film appear too predictable otherwise what point would there be for audiences to go and watch the film, if they can easily predict what’ll happen in the rest of the film itself just from what the trailer tells them? No, I want to keep my trailer mysterious and confusing so that the audiences cannot possibly predict the whole of my plot (or what would happen in my film if I made it) and I feel I have attempted this to some extent due to the feedback I have received. Though I’m pleased they can at least have a go and attempt to predict what will happen (and quite successfully too I might add) as this shows my trailer does hint at what could happen in the film, but leaves them with no definites or details of what will happen in the film. So it gives my audience a good, basic idea of what my film will be like/the outline of what might happen but they are left very unsure of what the final outcome will be (and therefore it will make my ending more shocking, and is vital not to give away in the trailer- which for me, is the truth of Ray, the little boy who is actually Jack’s innocence and doesn’t exist and Jack’s motives/reasons for killing the youth club owners).

Q: Do you think it is too confusing? If yes, how could this be overcome?

Their answers…

‘It maybe  is a little confusing but that’s good!- don’t want to give too much away..’

‘I think it is a bit confusing but you give enough away to let us know enough about the film to get interest.’

‘I don’t think it is confusing- it’s just mysterious. And thinking about the plot of your film (well as much as you’ve given me) I’d say mystery would be a good idea.’

What this tells me…

Well I’m quite happy with these replies as it shows that this storyboard is a big improvement on the previous one, which I had to change because inevitably, most found it far too confusing and I therefore thought I had not given audiences enough information to intrigue them to watch the film itself. So, I think this tells me I have overcome the far too confusing trailer a little bit as most of my feedback says it is a little confusing but thinks this helps the trailer become more interesting- they clearly don’t wish for it to be straightforward and simple as this would make them lose interest in the trailer itself. This has led me to consider that while I do need that element of confusion I want to be perfectly sure when filming/editing my trailer that it is not too confusing overall. 

Q: Overall, did you like my trailer? What did you like/ not like about it? Please give explanations.

Their answers…

Thankfully most answered ‘yes’ with an exception of one or two of course but you can’t ask for everything…

‘Yes I liked it a lot- I liked the music as it really fits the mood of the trailer- but maybe there could be a bit more dialogue’

 ‘Yes I did like your trailer- especially the titles, as they’re really effective and moving.’

‘I did like it- particularly the mystery- the fact it doesn’t give a lot away. The story also looks like it could be interesting and different.’

What this tells me…

Well it gives me evidence enough to think that my storyboard could successful and therefore used for the actual trailer- I think I have improved from the previous storyboard as this time, audience’s feedback appear a lot more positive and actually give me aspects that they said they really liked, which is interesting as I can see the areas in which I need to improve on and also the areas which are ok left how they are need perhaps limited improvement/development.

Q: Do you have any suggestions to make the trailer better?

Their answers…

‘You could add more music to put at the start or end of the trailer. It’s not vital but it could help add atmosphere.’

‘What could be a good idea is to change the font of the titles and make them look more interesting.’

‘Really I think the trailer is good but maybe you could add some more dialogue. Or more shots aswell?’

 What this tells me…

Maybe these suggestions are somewhat a little vague but really, I agree with all of the suggestions of improvements/developments the audience feedback gave me. For example, I totally agree with the comment on the music as I wasn’t very happy with it’s volume (it was a bit too quite to convey the atmosphere I wanted to create) and I can easily do some trials on different pieces of music I collect and get audience feedback to see which works best when I have filmed my trailer and have gone onto editing (as it’s not really something I need to worry about at this very moment and can worry about it at a later stage of my trailer- like I said, when I’m in the editing stage). I also agree with the title idea- to change the font/size/colour of my titles to give my trailer a more professional ‘look’ and help convey the mood and genre of the film. I only used basic titles in my storyboard because, like the music, I can worry about this aspect at a later date and develop it then. I also agree to some extent about the shot/dialogue comments about perhaps adding more of each of these aspects so as to give the audience more information about the film itself. But this is something I will have to think about when filming/editing as then I can really see whether my trailer will need these certain improvements.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s